Newsletter Changes payroll 2006


Important changes in the Dutch payroll as of January 1, 2006.


Dutch tax authorities also responsible for social security premiums payable


As of January 1, 2006 there is an important change in the rules regarding the Dutch wage tax and social security. In the past two authorities in The Netherlands were handling the wage tax and the social security: The Dutch tax authorities (wage tax) and The Dutch National Insurance Board (UWV, social security).

 

As of January 1, 2006 the Dutch National Insurance Board will not exist anymore and the Dutch tax authorities will be responsible for both the wage tax and the social security premiums.

 

Wage tax and social security payable on a monthly base

 

At this moment most of our clients are used to the system that the wage tax is paid quarterly during the tax year to the Dutch tax authorities, the social security premiums are paid based on the preliminary (estimated) invoice of the Dutch National Insurance l Board (UWV). This system is going to change tremendously.

 

As of January 1, 2006 the wage tax and the social security premiums need to be paid on a monthly base.

 

Electronic filing as of January 1, 2006

 

As of January 1, 2006 the wage tax return is filed electronically. It is not allowed to do it on paper anymore. This means that either the website of the Dutch tax authorities needs to be used to file the Dutch wage tax (the website is still in Dutch) or you can use specialised payroll software to file the wage tax return electronically.

 

What does this mean for the Dutch payroll?

 

The wage tax return is filed electronically at the end of the month. In this wage tax return the exact wage tax payable and the social security is declared. You will pay the exact amount of wage tax and social security on a monthly base to the Dutch tax authorities.

 

For example:

 

In the month January 2006 we run the payroll for employee X. We calculate the wage tax payable and the social security premiums payable for the month January 2006. Before the end of the month following January (February) we need to file the wage tax return. So we need to file the wage tax return before February 28, 2006 . The wage tax and social security for the month January 2006 need to be paid before February 28, 2006 . This means that the amount payable needs to be on the bank account of the Dutch tax authorities on February 28, 2006.

 

Fines

 

If the wage tax return is not filed and/or the wage tax and social security premiums are not paid at the last day of the month following the month for which the payroll was done a fine will be imposed of € 1.034.

 

Corrected wage tax return

 

What happens if afterwards appears that for a certain month the wage tax return was not correct? Of course there is always the possibility to file a corrected wage tax return for the specific month. This does not mean that you can put new employees on the Dutch payroll retrospectively. Please read the important information about the day-one-announcement.

 

Day-one-announcement for new employees on the Dutch payroll

 

As of January 1, 2006 employers who have employees working in The Netherlands have the legal obligation to inform the Dutch tax authorities before the first day that an employee is starting his activities as an employee in The Netherlands. This means that the employee needs to have a sofi number before he is starting his work in The Netherlands. Also it is important that the employer and employee realize that all the legal requirements need to be met before the employee is starting to work in The Netherlands (work permit, residency permit, sofi number, registration at the Town Hall).

 

Please note that there will be sincere fines if this rule is ignored.

 

The good news about the day-one-announcement until July 1, 2006

 

Because of all the changes in the Dutch payroll system the Dutch Government decided that until July 1, 2006 the day-one-announcement will not be effectuated with respect to the possible fines. There is still the legal obligation to inform the Dutch tax authorities before the first day that the employee is working in the Netherlands but the Dutch Government will not impose fines when the requirement is not met. Reason for this decision is that the Dutch tax authorities are still working on a system to inform them during 24 hours and 7 days a week (f.e. by the internet).

 

Summary of the implications for the Dutch payroll as of January 1, 2006

 

1. Employees need to be registered before the day they start working in the Netherlands ;

2. Employees need to have a Dutch sofi number (social security number) before they start working in the Netherlands ;

3. Wage tax and social security needs to be paid on a monthly base before the end of the month. If not paid in time fines will follow;

4. All the relevant information needs to be send to the Dutch payroll provider before the employee starts working in The Netherlands.

 

Obliged for the Dutch payroll:

 

1. For all employees we need the correct Dutch sofi number;

2. For all employees we need the correct date of birth and address;

3. For all employees we need a clear copy (no fax) of the identification card;

4. For all employees we need a dated and signed wage tax declaration;

5. For all employees we need a dated and signed (Dutch) employment agreement;

6. For all employees covered by an E101 declaration regarding the social security we need a copy of the declaration.

 

Health Care Insurance Act

 

As from the 1st of January 2006 , a new health care insurance system will be implemented in the Netherlands . Objective is to introduce the standard insurance against the costs of curative care in 2006. This care insurance puts an end to the current dual scheme of health insurance fund - and private insurance. The government determines which medical care is covered in this standard package. For inhabitants of the Netherlands it is compulsory to insure themselves. The care insurers are obliged to accept anyone who applies for insurance. Insured people can change to another care insurer once a year.

 

The premium exists partly out of a nominal fee for individual insured people. Employers pay an income-related contribution to the scheme. In 2006 this premium will be 6.5% of the salary with a maximum of € 1,951. It is not possible to prevent this, unless the employee has an E101 statement.

For the basic insurance you will have to pay a premium to the insurer. This is known as the nominal premium. Most likely this nominal premium will cost around € 1,100 per annum per person. For children under the age of 18 the basic insurance is free of charge.

Depending on your income and family situation, you may be eligible for compensation. This compensation is applicable if you are living alone and your income is not higher than € 25,068 per annum, or, if you are living together, your total income is not higher than € 40,120 per annum. Most contractors will not be eligible for a compensation because of the high salary.

 

In addition to the nominal premium, every person obliged to take out insurance has to pay an income-related contribution. The tax authorities have been designated as the administration agency for imposing and collecting the income-related contribution.

 

Supplementary insurance

 

Besides the compulsory standard insurance you can voluntarily take out an additional insurance. For the additional insurance no compulsory acceptance applies.

 

If you do not live in the Netherlands

 

The Health Care Insurance Act will also apply if you do not (yet) live in the Netherlands , but are working in the Netherlands . If this is the case, you are obliged to take out the basic insurance, for which you have to pay the nominal premium and the income-related contribution. In addition, you may be entitled to a health care allowance.

 

From January 1, 2005 , a no claim system is in place. This means that insured who claim less than € 250 per year will get part of their premium back at the beginning of the next year. The ones which have no care costs recover € 250. If, for example, the employee pays € 30 for medicine, he will get € 220 back. Who declares € 300, gets nothing. This includes medicines, visits to a specialist etc. Visits to your GP, maternal care etc., are not included.

Insurers must pay back this money this money at the beginning of the following year.

 

Important implications for expatriates living in the Netherlands

 

In the past it was not obliged to have a Dutch private health insurance (the governmental health insurance was obliged). In the new system the expatriate is obliged to have a Dutch health insurance. If the expatriate does not have a Dutch health insurance on March 1, 2006 a fine by the Dutch government will be imposed of 130% of the premium which wasn’t paid.

The Dutch government does not accept foreign health insurances. This means that if an employee is working in the Netherlands for a short period (without E101), he must pay to a Dutch health insurance for this period. Because of this rule it might be possible that he pays for 2 health insurances (one in your home country, one in The Netherlands).

 

Expatax can assist with arranging a proper health insurance for the employees.

 

Important implications for companies who have employees working in The Netherlands

 

A company car will be taxed in the payroll based on 22% of the list price.